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 Post subject: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Thu Nov 26, 2009 3:04 am 
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Pakistan buying Chinese J-10 Fighters
November 11, 2009

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Chengdu Jian-10

Pakistan and China have been cooperating for a number of years on the JF-17/ FC-1 Thunder, a low-medium performance, low-cost aircraft that has attracted interest and orders from a number of 3rd World air forces. In November 2009, a long-rumored deal was announced for China’s Jian-10/ FC-20 4+ generation fighter, whose overall performance compares well with the F-16C/D Block 52 aircraft that Pakistan has ordered from the United States.

The J-10 has been reported as a derivative of the 1980s Israeli Lavi project, and reportedly incorporates an Israeli fly-by-wire control base that was transferred in the project’s early years. The change in relations that followed the Tienanmen Square massacre hurt the J-10 project badly, however, forcing the replacement of planned Western avionics and engines with Chinese and Russian equipment. The required redesign was very extensive, affected all areas of the airframe, and took over a decade, amounting to the development of a new aircraft. The first operational J-10 unit entered service with the PLAAF in July 2004.

China has reportedly ordered 100 J-10s to date. The initial Pakistani order is for 2 squadrons, but could expand as technical cooperation and orders increase. The $1+ billion sale represents the J-10’s first export order… but almost certainly not its last.

Contracts and Key Events

Nov 11/09: Widespread reports surface that Pakistan has signed a $1.4 billion contract for 36 of China National Aero-Technology Import & Export Corporation (CATIC)’s Jian-10 fighters, which will be known as FC-20 in Pakistan. The deal is described as a preliminary agreement, and there are reports that Pakistan may eventually be interested in acquiring up to 150 of these aircraft. Retired Pakistani general Abdul Qayyum is qoted as saying that:

“The agreement should not simply be seen in the narrow context of Pakistan’s relations with China…. There is a wider dimension. By sharing its advanced technology with Pakistan, China is … also saying to the world that its defence capability is growing rapidly.”

The UK’s Financial Times echoes this theme, noting that the $21.7 billion Aviation Industry Corporation (AVIC) group is rapidly emerging as a big military goods exporter. The group is also involved in China’s civilian aircraft program, and gives only total revenue figures, but the Financial Times quotes industry sources who believe a recent remerger of 2 split-out groups late in 2008 was aimed at creating a bigger and internationally competitive player.

It is not clear whether Pakistan’s FC-20s will carry Russian Salyut AL-31FN turbofans (17,130/ 27,557 pounds dry/afterburner thrust) that are similar to the engines in many SU-27 family aircraft, or the larger Chinese WS-10A derivative (reportedly a lesser 16,523/ 24,729 pounds dry/afterburner thrust) developed by China’s AVIC Aviation Engine Institute and Shenyang Liming Aero-Engine Group.

Source: defenseindustrydaily


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Thu Nov 26, 2009 3:08 am 
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Pakistan wants production of FC-20 Aircraft: Defence Minister
November 24, 2009

ISLAMABAD: Federal Minister for Defence, Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar has said that after successful joint venture with China in manufacturing of JF-17 Thunder fighter aircraft, Pakistan wants production of FC-20 aircraft, known as J-10.

"We are in process of negotiations with China for another joint venture in the aviation industry, which will prove another milestone for the defence industry in Pakistan", the Minister said while talking to reporters on the sidelines of the roll-out ceremony of JF-17 Thunder held at Pakistan Aeronautical Complex (PAC) Kamra on Monday.

Responding to a question regarding the repair and overhauling of the Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) aircrafts in PAC Kamra, the Minister said that he would direct the national flag carrier to check the facilities at PAC Kamra and make sure that the PIA planes be repaired at PAC.

"It will not only reduce the cost, but also save time and national resources", he added. The most modern facilities in PAC are not less than any such facility abroad, Ahmed Mukhtar said. The serial production of JF-17 Thunder, will open new vistas for socio economic development in the country, as very soon Pakistan will be able to receive orders from abroad, the minister said.

- brecorder


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 2:43 am 
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PAF Eyeing J-10 or FC-20 Fighter Jets From China
December 19, 2009

by Owais Ehsan

China and Pakistan over the years have forged a formidable partnership in high-tech defense production. The recent revelation that the Chinese have agreed to the sale of 36 J-10B (FC-20) fighter jets to Pakistan is another sign of this ever growing partnership between the two Nuclear armed neighbors. China’s sale of the J-10 fighters to Pakistan, however, signals the depth of its strategic alliance with Pakistan. Pakistan will be the first country to receive the most advanced Chinese aircraft, which speaks volumes to Chinese faith in its strategic partnership with Pakistan.

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The boundary of this collaboration in recent years have really expanded , Jf17Thunder ,F22-p Frigates to name a few. The latest deal of buying J10 fighter jets for PAF from China was reportedly sealed for a massive $1.4 Billion. The number of aircrafts Pakistan would be buying are not known at the moment. Research at the James foundation does reveal some figures;

The deal marks the depth of a strategic alliance between Beijing and Islamabad. Some reports suggest that Pakistan is actually seeking 150 J-10 fighter jets, which go by Chengdu Jian-10 in China and F-10 in Pakistan, for a sum of $6 billion (The Hindu, November 11). The Pakistani government, however, dismisses such reports as inflated (Financial Times, November 10). Although Pakistan has not yet made the deal public, its prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, on November 23, confirmed that “his country is in talks with China for securing the J-10s” . Pakistan turned to China for these aircraft in 2006 after it failed to secure the F-16s from the United States (Dawn, May 1, 2006). General Pervez Musharraf, Pakistan’s former military ruler, who negotiated the deal during his visit to China in 2006, is the real architect of this grand sale (The Hindu, November 11).


The J-10s are China’s third generation fighter aircraft that it has indigenously developed (The Hindu, November 11) and manufactured at the Chengdu Aircraft Industry (CAI). Some observers, however, believe that J-10s are China’s fourth generation aircraft. “This aircraft is a cousin to the Israeli Lavi (upon which it is based) and roughly equivalent in capabilities to the U.S. F-16C flown by several air forces around the world” (See “China’s Re-emergence as an Arms Dealer: The Return of the King?” China Brief, July 9). The J-10s started development in the mid-1980s and finally entered production for the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) about three or four years ago. Aviation experts rank them below the F-16s, the Swedish Gripen and other smaller combat aircraft (China Brief, July 9). According to a report in The Hindu (November 11), China is working on developing its fourth generation fighter jets as well. The United States, The Hindu report further claims, is the only country that possesses a fourth generation combat aircraft-the F-22s. Yet aviation experts believe the F-22s are fifth generation fighter jets. Chinese Deputy Commander of the PLAAF General He Weirong claimed that “China would operationalize its very own fourth generation aircraft in the next eight or ten years” (The Hindu, November 11). The Chinese official further claimed that the fourth generation planes would “match or exceed the capacity of similar jets in existence today” (The Hindu, November 11).


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In anticipation, China is also training Pakistani fighter pilots for flying the fourth generation combat aircraft. On January 16, it delivered eight Karakoram K-8P trainer jets to Pakistan for this purpose. According to an official statement, the K-8P jets had enhanced the basic training of PAF pilots and provided a “potent platform for their smooth transition to more challenging fourth generation fighter aircraft” (The Asian Defence, January 16). The K-8P is an advanced trainer jet that has been jointly developed by China and Pakistan. It is already in service at the PAF Academy. At the handing-over ceremony for the K-8Ps, a visiting Chinese delegation as well as high-ranking PAF officers were in attendance.

J-10 or F-10 Aircraft Specifications

General characteristics

* Crew: 1 (basic), 2 (trainer variant)
* Length: 15.5 m (50 ft 10 in)
* Wingspan: 9.7 m (31 ft 10 in)
* Height: 4.78 m (15.7 ft)
* Wing area: 39 m² (419.8 ft²)
* Empty weight: 8,000–9,730 kg (17,637–21,451 lb)
* Loaded weight: 18,500 kg (40,785 lb)
* Useful load: 4,500 kg (9,920 lb)
* Max takeoff weight: 19,277 kg (42,500 lb)
* Powerplant: 1× Saturn-Lyulka AL-31FN or WS-10A Taihang turbofan
o Dry thrust: 79.43 kN / 89.17 kN (17,860 lbf / 20,050 lbf)
o Thrust with afterburner: 122.5 kN[7] / 129.4 kN (27,557 lbf / 29,101 lbf)

Performance

* Maximum speed: Mach 1.9 at altitude[7], Mach 1.2 at sea level
* g-limits: +9/-3 g (+88/-29 m/s², +290/-97 ft/s²)
* Combat radius:
o On hi-lo-hi mission: 2,540 km (1,370 nautical miles) with 4,000lb/1,814kg bombload and two air-to-air missiles
o On lo-lo-lo mission: 1,310 km (710 nautical miles with 4,000lb/1,814kg bombload and two air-to-air missiles
* Maximum range (without refueling): 3,400 km (2,113 mi)
* Service ceiling: 18,000 m (59,055 ft)
* Wing loading: 335 kg/m² (64 lb/ft²)

Armament

* Guns: 1× 23mm twin-barrel cannon
* Hardpoints: 11 in total (6× under-wing, 5× under-fuselage) with a capacity of 6,000 kg (13,228 lb) external fuel and ordnance [37],
* Rockets: 90 mm unguided rocket pods
* Missiles:
o Air-to-air missiles: PL-8, PL-9, PL-11, PL-12
o Air-to-surface missiles: PJ-9, YJ-9K
* Bombs: laser-guided bombs (LT-2), glide bombs (LS-6) and unguided bombs
* Others:
o Up to 3 external fuel drop-tanks (1× under-fuselage, 2× under-wing) for extended range and loitering time

Avionics

* NRIET KLJ-10 multi-mode fire-control radar
* Externally-mounted avionics pods:
o Type Hongguang-I infra-red search and track pod
o BM/KG300G self-protection jamming pod
o KZ900 electronic reconnaissance pod
o Blue Sky navigation/attack pod
o FILAT (Forward-looking Infra-red Laser Attack Targeting) pod


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 6:34 am 
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J-10: The New Cornerstone of Sino-Pakistani Defense Cooperation
Publication: China Brief Volume: 9 Issue: 25December 16, 2009 03:46 PM Age: 42 daysCategory: China Brief, Home Page, Military/Security, China and the Asia-Pacific, South Asia, Featured

By: Tarique Niazi

China and Pakistan have forged a formidable partnership in high-tech defense production. This partnership is born of their ever-deepening military and strategic cooperation that is also reflective of the burgeoning capacity of China's defense industries and the budding Sino-Pakistani defense relationship. The epitome of this bilateralism is the recent revelation that the Chinese have agreed to the sale of 36 J-10B fighter jets to Pakistan (Financial Times, November 10). The J-10 aircrafts are known to be one of the most advanced weapon systems in China’s arsenal, of which Pakistan will be the first recipient. With the delivery of 36 fighter jets, the Pakistan Air Force (PAF) will raise two fighting squadrons that will further sharpen its combativeness. The J-10 deal was reportedly sealed for a whopping $1.4 billion, which accounts for 70 percent of Chinese average arms sales of $2 billion a year (China Brief, July 9).

The J-10 Sale Epitomizes Strategic Alliance

The deal marks the depth of a strategic alliance between Beijing and Islamabad. Some reports suggest that Pakistan is actually seeking 150 J-10 fighter jets, which go by Chengdu Jian-10 in China and F-10 in Pakistan, for a sum of $6 billion (The Hindu, November 11). The Pakistani government, however, dismisses such reports as inflated (Financial Times, November 10). Although Pakistan has not yet made the deal public, its prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, on November 23, confirmed that “his country is in talks with China for securing the J-10s” [1]. Pakistan turned to China for these aircraft in 2006 after it failed to secure the F-16s from the United States (Dawn, May 1, 2006). General Pervez Musharraf, Pakistan’s former military ruler, who negotiated the deal during his visit to China in 2006, is the real architect of this grand sale (The Hindu, November 11).

The J-10s are China’s third generation fighter aircraft that it has indigenously developed (The Hindu, November 11) and manufactured at the Chengdu Aircraft Industry (CAI). Some observers, however, believe that J-10s are China’s fourth generation aircraft. “This aircraft is a cousin to the Israeli Lavi (upon which it is based) and roughly equivalent in capabilities to the U.S. F-16C flown by several air forces around the world” (See "China’s Re-emergence as an Arms Dealer: The Return of the King?" China Brief, July 9). The J-10s started development in the mid-1980s and finally entered production for the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) about three or four years ago. Aviation experts rank them below the F-16s, the Swedish Gripen and other smaller combat aircraft (China Brief, July 9). According to a report in The Hindu (November 11), China is working on developing its fourth generation fighter jets as well. The United States, The Hindu report further claims, is the only country that possesses a fourth generation combat aircraft—the F-22s. Yet aviation experts believe the F-22s are fifth generation fighter jets. Chinese Deputy Commander of the PLAAF General He Weirong claimed that “China would operationalize its very own fourth generation aircraft in the next eight or ten years” (The Hindu, November 11). The Chinese official further claimed that the fourth generation planes would “match or exceed the capacity of similar jets in existence today” (The Hindu, November 11).

In anticipation, China is also training Pakistani fighter pilots for flying the fourth generation combat aircraft. On January 16, it delivered eight Karakoram K-8P trainer jets to Pakistan for this purpose. According to an official statement, the K-8P jets had enhanced the basic training of PAF pilots and provided a “potent platform for their smooth transition to more challenging fourth generation fighter aircraft” (The Asian Defence, January 16). The K-8P is an advanced trainer jet that has been jointly developed by China and Pakistan. It is already in service at the PAF Academy. At the handing-over ceremony for the K-8Ps, a visiting Chinese delegation as well as high-ranking PAF officers were in attendance.

China’s sale of the J-10 fighters to Pakistan, however, signals the depth of its strategic alliance with Pakistan. Pakistan will be the first country to receive the most advanced Chinese aircraft, which speaks volumes to Chinese faith in its strategic partnership with Pakistan. Defense analysts, however, believe that the sale sends an important message to the world that China’s “defense capability is growing rapidly” (Financial Times, November 10). China-Pakistan military relations spanned over 43 years, starting in 1966 when China provided Pakistan with F-6s, which were followed by the successive supply of such aircraft as FT5, A5, F-7P, F-7PG and K-8 (Jang, November 22).

These relations continue to grow with high-level exchanges in the defense sector. As recently as October of this year, Chinese Vice-Minister Chen Qiufa, administrator of China’s State Administration for Science, Technology & Industry for National Defense (SASTIND), led a delegation of Chinese defense-companies to Pakistan. He called on Prime Minister Gilani and discussed cooperation in the JF-17 Thunder Project, Al Khalid tank, F-22 frigates, Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS), and aircraft and naval ships (APP, October 17). The Chinese delegation included representatives from China's missile technology firm Poly Technologies as well as Aviation Industries Corp. of China, China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation, China Electronics Technology Group and China North Industry Corporation.

Although there is a proliferation of joint defense projects between China and Pakistan, their collaboration in aviation industry has peaked at the turn of the millennium. The mainstay of their joint defense production is the Pakistan Aeronautical Complex (PAC) in Kamra (Punjab), which services, assembles and manufactures fighter and trainer aircraft. The PAC is rated as the world’s third largest assembly plant. Initially, it was founded with Chinese assistance to rebuild Chinese aircraft in the PAF fleet, which included Shenyang F-6 (now retired), Nanchang A-5, F-7 combat aircraft, Shenyang FT-5 and FT-6 Jet trainer aircraft. The PAC also houses the Kamra Radar and Avionics Factory (KARF), which is meant to assemble and overhaul airborne as well as ground-based radar systems, electronics, and avionics. The KARF, which is ISO-9002 certified, has upgraded the PAF Chengdu F-7P interceptor fleet. Over time, the PAC has expanded its operation into aircraft manufacturing, and built a specialized manufacturing unit in the 1980s: The Aircraft Manufacturing Factory (AMF). The AMF got noticed in the region when it partnered with the Hongdu Aviation Industry Group of China to design, develop and coproduce the K-8 Karakoram (Hongdu JL-8), which is an advanced jet trainer. The AMF’s flagship project, however, is the Sino-Pakistani joint production and manufacture of the JF-17 Thunder aircraft, which it is producing with the Chengdu Aircraft Industry (CAI).

JF-17 Thunder Makes Over the PAF

In recent history, China and Pakistan set out for the joint production of JF-17 combat aircraft that both countries consider a substitute for U.S. F-16s. Pakistan’s indigenous manufacture of the first JF-17 (which goes by FC-1 in China) came to fruition on November 23, when Pakistan Aeronautical Complex (PAC), an arm of the Pakistan Air Force, turned it over to the PAF to the chants of “Long Live Pak-China Friendship” (The News International, November 24).

Pakistan’s Prime Minister, Pakistan Chief of Army Staff and Chinese Ambassador to Pakistan, Lou Zhaohui, were among the dignitaries who attended the handing-over ceremony. Chinese Ambassador Zhaohui, speaking on the occasion, told his audience: “China wants to further broaden the defense cooperation with Pakistan” (Jang, November 23). The PAF already has 10 JF-17s, which were produced in China, in its fleet. The JF-17 project began in 1992, under which China agreed to transfer technology for the aircraft’s joint production. The project was hampered in 1999, when Pakistan came under proliferation sanctions. It gained momentum in 2001.

On September 3, 2003, its prototype, which was manufactured in China, conducted the first test flight. The PAF claims that the JF-17s, with a glass cockpit and modern avionics, are comparable to any fighter plane (Jang, November 23). It is a lightweight combat jet, fitted with turbofan engine, advanced flight control, and the most advanced weapons delivery system. As a supersonic plane, its speed is 1.6 times the speed of its sound, and its ability to refuel midair makes it a “stand-out” (Jang, November 23). Pakistan intends to raise a squadron of JF-17s by 2010. The Chief of Air Staff of the PAF told a newspaper that JF-17s would help “replace the existing fleet of the PAF comprising F-7s, A-5s and all Mirage aircraft” (The News International, November 08). Eventually, Pakistan will have 350 JF-17s that will completely replace its ageing fleet.

Pakistan also plans to export these aircraft to developing countries for which, it says, orders have already started pouring in (Jang, November 22). China and Pakistan anticipate an annual export of 40 JF-17s to Asian, African and Middle Eastern nations [2]. At $25 million apiece, the export of 40 aircraft will fetch them $1 billion per year. There are estimates that Asia will purchase 1,000 to 1,500 aircraft over the next 15 years. In this Sino-Pakistani joint venture, Pakistan will have 58 percent of shares, while China will have 42 percent (The News International, November 25). Besides defense aviation, China and Pakistan are closely collaborating on the joint production of naval ships as well.

Chinese Frigates for the Pakistan Navy

China and Pakistan worked out a $750 million loan to help Pakistan build four F-22P frigates (The News International, September 16, 2004). In 2004, Pakistan negotiated this non-commercial (i.e. low-cost) loan with China for the joint manufacture of naval ships. China and Pakistan have since moved fast to begin work on this project. They have now expanded the original deal to build eight F22P frigates respectively at Hudong Zhonghua shipyard in Shanghai, China, and Karachi shipyard and Engineering Works (KSEW), Pakistan. The manufacturing cost of each F22P Frigate, which is an improved version of China’s original Type 053H3 Frigate, is $175 million. At this rate, the cost of eight frigates will run at about $1.4 billion.

The first Chinese-built F-22 frigate, named PNS Zulfiqar (Arabic for sword), was delivered to Pakistan on July 30 (The Nation, July 31). A month later, the ship was formally commissioned in the Pakistan Navy fleet in September. Soon after its arrival in July, the ship participated in the Pakistan Navy’s SeaSpark exercises. Of the original four frigates, three were to be built in China and one in Pakistan (Asia Times, July 11, 2007). After the delivery of PNS Zulfiqar, the remaining two ships that are being built in China are expected to be commissioned in the Pakistan Navy fleet by 2010. The fourth ship being built in Pakistan’s Karachi shipyard will be ready by 2013 (Asia Times, July 11, 2007).

The Pakistan Navy describes the F-22P frigate as a Sword Class ship that is equipped with long-range surface-to-surface missiles (SSM) and surface-to-air missiles (SAM), depth charges, torpedoes, the latest 76mm guns, a close-in-weapons system (CIWS), sensors, electronic warfare and an advanced command and control system (The Nation, July 31). The ship has a displacement of 3,000 tons and carries anti-submarine Z9EC helicopters. China has already delivered the first batch of two such helicopters to Pakistan. Although the Pakistan Navy has Sea-King helicopters for anti-submarine operations, it is now acquiring Chinese Z9ECs to enhance its operational capabilities (The Nation, July 31). In addition to building eight frigates, the Sino-Pakistan defense deal includes the upgrading of the Karachi dockyard for indigenous production of a modern surface fleet. The frigates deal is the first of its kind between China and Pakistan, which forges their two navies into a high-level collaboration for boosting their surface fleet.

Conclusion

At the turn of the millennium, China and Pakistan have diversified their defense trade into joint defense production. They have since been collaborating on the production of most advanced weapons systems, such as the JF-17s combat aircraft and F-22P Frigates. Pakistan will receive the transfer of technology for the J-10s as well. China recognizes that Pakistan is rich with human capital in the high-tech defense industry, which serves as a magnet for its investment. Both China and Pakistan look to capture wider defense export markets in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. At the same time, their growing cooperation in aviation and naval defense systems signals an important shift in Pakistan’s military doctrine that traditionally favored Army (especially ground forces) over its sister services—Navy and Air Force. In the region’s changing strategic environment, in which China has growing stakes, Pakistan has come to recognize the critical importance of air and naval defense. The China-Pakistan collaboration in aviation and naval defense amply embodies this recognition.

Source: The Jamestown Foundation


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2010 1:37 pm 
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China’s 4th gen J-10 fighter redesigned, upgraded by Pakistan as FC-20
April 13, 2010

Some versions of the redesigned J-10s will take off in 2009, however the official flight date for the Pakistani FC-20s is 2015, but in actuality the Pakistanis are way ahead on the schedule and working beyond the J-10 redesigns. The PAF is looking beyond the JF-17 thunders and the J-10s. The design for the next generation of Pakistani aircraft has already begun. The Chinese J-10s are ready for export now. The redesign and upgrade of the FC-20s will take about five more years.

BEIJING, April 13 (APP): China Tuesday put on display its most modern 4th generation state of the art fighter aircraft.The unveiling ceremony of the J-10 single seat aircraft was held in the port city of Tianjin about 130- KM away from Beijing in which air attaches from over fifty countries and a large number of international media participated.A formation of four aircraft in groups and individually demonstrated stellar performances of maneuvering and acrobat with great skill that last over twenty minutes at the base of 24th Air division of People’s Liberation Army IPLA).

Link: http://militarystrat.wordpress.com/2010 ... -as-fc-20/


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2011 3:36 pm 
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Source: Jang Newspaper


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2011 10:38 pm 
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China to give squadron of J-10B fighters to Pakistan
July 30, 2011

Taking bilateral defence relations to a new high, China will give Pakistan a squadron of the advanced J-10B fighter aircraft, a media report said.

The offer was made by senior Chinese military leaders to visiting Pakistan Army's Chief of General Staff, Lt. Gen. Waheed Arshad, the Urdu daily Jang reported Saturday, quoting defence sources.

The J-10B fighters are equipped with the latest weapons and Pakistan will be the first country, after China, to have these advanced aircraft, it said.

During his visit, Lt.Gen.Arshad was assured that the defence relationship between the two countries will reach new heights and China's efforts for the safety and security of Pakistan will be never-ending.

During his visit, Waheed called on General Ma Xiaotian, deputy chief of general staff of People's Liberation Army and other officials including Lt. General Ren Haiquan, the vice president of the National Defence University.

Source: http://in.news.yahoo.com/china-squadron ... 31077.html


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:28 am 
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China officially offers J-10 fighters to Pakistan
July 30, 2011

China is offering Pakistan a squadron of J-10B, the advanced multi-role, all-weather fighter aircraft. The official offer was presented to the Pakistan Army’s Chief of General Staff, Lt Gen Waheed Arshad, during a week long visit to Beijing. If such delivery takes place, Pakistan will be the first country, after China, to operate the J-10B, considered as one of China’s most advanced, operational combat aircraft.

Pakistan and China have been negotiating the potential sale of Chengdu J-10 fighters for several years, with Pakistan seeking to acquire at least two squadrons of the aircraft. However, the newest B version, considered as comparable to the F-16 Block 50/52, surfaced for the first time last week.

Meanwhile the two countries are already underway in the local production of the Chinese designed JF-17, commonly known as ‘Thunder’. The aircraft is currently being produced in Pakistan and actively promoted for export in the world market.

The newest version of the aircraft designated J-10B made its first flight in 2009. The noticeable changes from the original J-10 are a new radome geometry reducing the radar signature of the aircraft, also contributing to this fighter’s stealth performance is the redesigned inlet, which also delivers higher massflow.

Avionics compartments were also installed on the vertical tail and inboard pylons, probably containing various sensors and electronic countermeasures. A new electro-optical sensor turret, most likely an Infra-Red Search / Track (IRST) set has also been introduced. It is also assumed the new version is designed to be fitted with the more powerful engine and larger radar than those used on the J-10A version.

Source: http://defense-update.com/20110731china ... istan.html


Last edited by Salman Haider on Thu Aug 04, 2011 6:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 12:13 pm 
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Chengdu J-10 fighters may have been tested with Taihang engine
August 2, 2011

By Ted Parsons JDW Correspondent

Recently surfaced images indicate that the Chengdu Aircraft Corporation (CAC) J-10 fighter has passed a significant milestone in being tested with an indigenous Chinese turbofan. The engine in question is most probably a version of the WS-10A Taihang.

The nearly 200 J-10A fighters manufactured to date have been powered by the 12,745 kg (28,100 lb) thrust Russian Saturn AL-31FN, which features a relocated engine gearbox to fit the J-10A airframe. A USD500 million order in early July for 123 Al-31FNs brought Chengdu's total order for the powerplants to 399.

Unconfirmed reports emerged from the November 2010 Zhuhai Airshow that a J-10 had been tested with a version of the WS-10 turbofan. However, images taken in late July at the CAC test field show a prototype J-10B fighter powered by a version of the WS-10A with a distinctly shorter tailpipe. Chinese reports indicate the J-10B, which first emerged in early 2009, could enter full production later this year. Recent construction at CAC has resulted in an expansion of production facilities to accommodate future J-20 fifth-generation fighter production and perhaps expanded production of the J-10. The J-10B also features a redesigned engine inlet, plus a new active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, new electronic warfare systems and an infrared tracking system.

Although it is not yet certain that the People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) will adopt the WS-10A powered J-10B, this fighter would not face the foreign sales restrictions of the Al-31FN powered J-10A and would offer the PLAAF a means for accelerating J-10 production. However, the source for Chengdu's Taihang engines is less clear, as this engine currently produced by the Shenyang Liming Engine Company, is thought to be dedicated to producing the Shenyang Aircraft Corporation's J-11B and J-15 twin engine fighters. However, recent Chinese reports indicate that the No 430 Factory of the X'ian Aeroengine Company and the No 460 Factory of the Guizhou Liyang Machinery Company, a longstanding CAC partner, may also be involved in partial or complete Taihang production. An expansion of WS-10 production as well as its adoption for the J-10 would indicate a higher Chinese confidence in this engine than has been credited by recent Western assessments.

I have been stating all along on this forum that China could not sell the J-10A to Pakistan because of the re-export restrictions placed on its Russian engine. now that significant progress seems to have been made with the chinese engine, a batch of J-10B is being offered for T&E to the PAF before large numbers are inducted in its inventory.


Quote:
Detail differences of J10-B from original J-10A

The J-10B is a modified variant of the J-10 multirole fighter aircraft, with modifications in airframe and avionics. Chengdu Aircraft Corporation (CAC) of AVIC began to develop a follow-on variant of its J-10 fighter around 2004/05. A J-10B prototype reportedly made its maiden flight in December 2008. Photos of the aircraft began to emerge on the Chinese Internet in March 2009. Once commissioned, the J-10B is likely going to become the standard for later J-10 productions.

Rampless Inlet

The J-10B features a chin-mounted diffuser supersonic inlet (DSI) air inlet. The traditional rectangle-shape air inlet on the J-10 requires a large moveable inlet ramp to generate a rearward leaning oblique shock wave to aid the inlet compression process. The ramp sits at an acute angle to deflect the intake air stream from the longitudinal direction. The air inlets comprises many moving parts, which increases the aircraft’s weight and radar reflections.

The newly designed rampless inlet, first tested on the FC-1/JF-17 fighter design by Chengdu, employs a one-piece bump at the top of the inlet replacing the movable ramp. This eliminates all moving parts on the inlet, lightening the overall weight and reducing the aircraft’s radar signature.

Electro-Optic Targeting System

The J-10B has been added with an electronic-optic targeting system (EOTS) commonly found on all fourth-generation Russian fighter aircraft such as Su-27 and MiG-29. Placed forward of the cockpit canopy to the right, the system comprises an infrared search and track (IRST) sensor and a laser rangefinder, which can detect enemy targets passively without requiring to turn on the fire-control radar, thus reducing the chance of the aircraft being detected. The EOTS of the J-10B is likely based on a Russian design.

Tailfin ECM Pod

The upper edge of J-10B’s tailfin is curved, in contrast to the straight-edged tailfin of the J-10. A large fairing is added to the tip of the tailfin to accommodate electronic warfare and countermeasures (EW/ECM) equipment.

ECM Antenna Array

The J-10B has four black antenna arrays attached externally to the fuselage, a larger one on either side of the cockpit and a smaller one on either side of the rear fuselage near the engine nozzle. The specific purpose of these antennas is unknown but they are thought to be for electronic countermeasures purpose.


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 6:48 pm 
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China officially offers Pakistan J-10 Variant
August 3, 2011

By Usman Ansari

ISLAMABAD: China for the first time officially offered Pakistan a variant of its most advanced frontline fighter, the Chengdu J-10 Vigorous Dragon/F-10 Vanguard.

Citing defense sources, the offer was reported in the Urdu press here over the weekend. The offer was made during the recent visit to China by Lt. Gen. Waheed Arshad, the Pakistani Army chief of General Staff.

Official Pakistani interest in the fighter dates back to February 2006, when then-Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf toured the J-10 production facilities on a trip to China. Pakistani government approval for the purchase of 36 FC-20s, a Pakistani-specific variant, was given in April 2006. Service entry was slated for the middle of the decade.

Precise details of the deal are not yet known. However, Usman Shabbir of the Pakistan Military Consortium think tank, said "the initial deal will be for at least two squadrons [at least 32 aircraft] and will be financed by China via a soft, long-term loan."

Analyst Kaiser Tufail said the J-10's operational autonomy would be far greater than that provided by the U.S.-built F-16C.

"It has to be remembered that India refused to consider the F-16C/D and F-18E/F, as they wanted a freer hand in operability aspects as well as technology transfer, which the U.S. was unwilling to provide," Tufail said.

With the J-10, Pakistan would "be able to operate it in an environment not constrained by security restrictions," and could base the aircraft wherever desired, Tufail said. He also said the lack of technology-transfer restrictions from the original equipment manufacturer is a factor.

"The J-10 will provide F-16-class capabilities for Pakistan but without the cost and political encumbrances of U.S.-sourced aircraft," Carlo Kopp of the Air Power Australia think tank said.

"What a J-10 would provide is quantity over any U.S.- or EU-sourced product," Kopp said, though he is still uncertain whether China will supply "pre-loved J-10A…or new-build J-10A or J-10B airframes."

Shabbir said the broader Sino-Pakistani combat aircraft relationship has eroded Western influence over Pakistan, though he remains concerned about the implications Pakistan's fragile economy has for its defense capabilities.

"The availability of J-10 and JF-17 from the Chinese means that Pakistan is now not that reliant on the U.S. and Europe for its aircraft requirements, and this of course will erode U.S influence over Pakistan in the long term," he said.

The Pakistani Air Force is the largest operator of U.S supplied weapons in South Asia and therefore most vulnerable to sanctions.

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i= ... =ASI&s=AIR


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:19 am 
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China Gives J-10s Away
August 4, 2011

China recently announced that it would give Pakistan a squadron of J-10B fighter-bombers. That would be about twelve aircraft, which have been offered for export, for about half what the similar F-16 costs . The only buyer so far has been Pakistan, which ordered 36 J-10As earlier this year, with the goal of eventually getting 150. So the offer to Pakistan is mainly promotional (to get a foreign "customer" who can say what swell aircraft the J-10B is) and partly political (to show what a good ally China is, coming to the aid of Pakistan when the United States is threatening to cut the billions of dollars a year Pakistan has been receiving.)

However, the J-10 is the kind of gift most air forces would rather not receive. The J-10 is a strange, and dubious, war bird. Moreover, it was only two years ago that China publicly admitted that its new J-10s jet fighter existed. This despite the fact that the J-10 had entered service six years earlier, and there were plenty of J-10 photos on the Internet.

There are only about 200 J-10s are in service, most of them the original J-10As. they are being offered to export customers for about $42 million each. Currently, China is producing 2-3 J-10s a month.

The new and improved J-10B model carries improved electronics, including better radar warning, a laser range finder and targeting electronics. The new nose cone looks like the one on the F-16, indicating that the J-10B is to be fitted with an AESA (phased array) radar (which is more capable and more reliable than older types, but also more expensive.) The cockpit also has a larger and more detailed HUD (Head Up Display). The J-10B is apparently a much more effective aircraft than the J-10A.

But the J-10 already has a reputation as a maintenance nightmare, and that the Chinese are having a hard time keeping the aircraft operational in reasonable numbers. But the J-10 is the first modern jet fighter designed and built in China. The aircraft is an attempt to create a modern fighter-bomber that could compete with foreign designs. The experiment was not completely successful.

Work on the J-10 began over twenty years ago, in an attempt to develop an aircraft that could compete with the Russian MiG-29s and Su-27s, and the American F-16. But the first prototype did not fly until 1998. There were problems, and it wasn't until 2000 that the basic design flaws were fixed. By 2002, nine prototypes had been built, and flight testing was going forward to find, and fix, hundreds of smaller problems. It was a great learning experience for Chinese engineers, but it was becoming apparent that the J10 was not going to be competitive with the Su-27s/30s China was buying from Russia.

The J-10 looks something like the American F-16, and weighs about the same (19 tons). Like the F-16, and unlike the Su-27, the J-10 has only one engine. Originally, the J-10 used a Russian AL-31FN engine, but China has been working for a decade to manufacture their own version of this, the WS10A. The WS10A is something of an acid test for them, as it is a powerful military engine, and a complex piece of work. Russia refused to license China to produce the AL-31FN, so the Chinese stole as much of the technology as they could and designed the WS10A. This engine has been tested, and officially approved for production, but apparently still has quality control and performance problems.

It's no accident that the J-10 resembles the F-16, because Israel apparently sold them technology for the Israeli Lavi jet fighter. Israel abandoned the Lavi project, because of the high cost and availability of cheaper alternatives (buying F-16s and F-15s from the United States.) But the Lavi was meant to be a super F-16, and incorporated a lot of design ideas from the F-16 (which the Israelis were very familiar with, as they used them, and had developed new components for them.)

Source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htproc ... 10804.aspx


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:30 am 
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China’s J-10B fighter to Pak worries India
August 4, 2011

By Hemanth CS

The recent official offer of the Chinese to raise a squadron of its home-grown advanced multi-role, all-weather fighter aircraft J-10B to Pakistan has worried Indian defence experts. Pakistan will be the only other country apart from China to have this sophisticated fighter aircraft.

Air Commodore (Retd) Jasjit Singh, director, New Delhi-based Centre for Air Power Studies (CAPS), told DNA: “India now not only faces the possibility of a two-front war but has to also deal with a two-front military modernisation programme with China supplying its latest weaponry to Pakistan.”

He said India faces a 10-year window of vulnerability as the Indian Air Force’s (IAF’s) present squadron of 34 is way below the sanctioned strength of 39 squadrons. “It will take 10 years for the IAF to get back to its sanctioned strength of 39 squadrons. While Pakistan at present, with 24 squadrons, is raising its strength rapidly with China’s support,” said Singh, who is also the former director of Institute for Defence Studies and Analysis.

Former Vice Chief of Air Staff, Air Marshal PK Barbora, however, said China’s offering Pakistan a squadron of the J-10s may not threaten India’s air superiority. “China does not have a great record of producing a world-class aircraft. All they do is reverse engineer and manufacture aircraft. Secondly, by raising just one squadron Pakistan may not benefit much,” he said.

However, Pakistani media reports indicate that it is looking at raising two squadrons of the fourth generation aircraft to counter India’s Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) Tejas, which is still under development. Besides, according to US military and defence technology news website, Defense Update, the Chinese designed Joint Fighter (JF)-17 (commonly known as ‘Thunder’) is already under production in Pakistan and is actively being promoted for export in the world market.

Despite his optimism, Air Marshal Barbora warned that the slow pace of India’s defence indigenisation (read LCA Tejas, in particular) is a cause for worry. “We will be adding 300 more Su-30 MKIs; getting 126 medium multi role combat aircraft; and upgrading the Mirage 2000s, Jaguars and the MiG-29s. The same cannot be said of some pathetic status of indigenous programmes like the Light Combat Aircraft, which has been delayed for years now,” he says.

Source: http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_ch ... ia_1572508


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 Post subject: Re: Pakistan buying Chinese FC-20/J-10 Fighters
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 3:41 pm 
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Thanks for sharing, I love this forum...Long live Pak cheen dosti

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